European court rules compulsory vaccinations for children as legal and 'necessary'


The Strasbourg-based court was answering a complaint brought by Czech families regarding mandatory jabs for children. The court ruled: “The measures could be regarded as being ‘necessary in a democratic society.’” Legal experts said the decision could pave the way for governments introducing compulsory vaccinations against coronavirus.

Nicolas Hervieu, who specialises in the ECHR, said it “reinforces the possibility of a compulsory vaccination under conditions of the current COVID-19 pandemic”.

The ruling didn’t directly Covid vaccination campaigns, but experts believe it could be used to encourage people that have so far refused to accept a jab.

It said that compulsory vaccines administered by Czech health authorities were in line with the “best interests” of children.

The court added: “The objective has to be that every child is protected against serious diseases, though vaccination or by virtue of herd immunity.”

It said that Czech health policy was not in violation of Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights – the right to respect for a private life.

Under Czech law, children must be vaccinated against nine diseases, including diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, hepatitis B and measles.

The case was brought by families that had been fined or whose children had been refused access to nursery for failing to comply with the law.

The case was brought by families that had been fined or whose children had been refused access to nursery for failing to comply with the law.

The ECHR is not an EU institution and the bloc is not a signatory to its human rights convention.

Britain, however, is a member and UK courts will need to take account of the ECHR decision, but are not bound by it.



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